Investigating Pre-service English Teachers’ Beliefs of Sociolinguistic Instruction in EFL Classes in Taiwan

https://doi.org/10.48185/tts.v2i2.219

Authors

Keywords:

pre-service English teachers, teachers’ beliefs, sociolinguistic skills, English as a foreign language (EFL)

Abstract

The study investigates Taiwanese English teachers’ beliefs of teaching sociolinguistic skills. Ten EFL pre-service English teachers in teacher education programs were purposively selected via homogeneous sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect the data. The results revealed that although most pre-service teachers consider sociolinguistic instruction important, they feel that they did not have adequate sociolinguistic competence, and that they lack confidence in teaching sociolinguistic skills. These pre-service teachers’ self-reported inadequate sociolinguistic competence and low confidence in teaching sociolinguistic skills could be attributed to such sociocultural factors as time constraints, exam-driven teaching culture, and insufficient exposure to the target language culture, as well as materials deprived of authentic pragmatic content. The study concludes with major findings, pedagogical implications and suggestions for future research.

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Author Biography

Hsueh-Hua Chuang, National Sun Yat-sen University

Dr. Hsueh-Hua Chuang is a professor of Center for Teacher Education and Graduate Institute of Education, and director of International Graduate Program of Education and Human Development at National Sun Yat-sen University in Taiwan. Her research interests include multimedia learning, faculty professional development, and technology adoption at schools. She can be reached at hsuehhua@g-mail.nsysu.edu.tw

Published

2021-06-30

How to Cite

Hsieh, M.-H., & Chuang, H.-H. (2021). Investigating Pre-service English Teachers’ Beliefs of Sociolinguistic Instruction in EFL Classes in Taiwan. TESOL and Technology Studies, 2(2), 16–28. https://doi.org/10.48185/tts.v2i2.219

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Section

Articles